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What would have happened if Derek Fisher left the Lakers last season for the Miami Heat?

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Awaiting Derek Fisher at a Miami airport stood LeBron James, who had just days earlier announced in a one-hour "Decision" that he'd be taking his talents to South Beach.

Now the Heat wondered if Fisher, a five-time NBA champion with the Lakers, would be willing to do the same. Fisher was only three weeks removed from helping the Lakers secure their second consecutive NBA championship with his bread-and-butter qualities, including team leadership and clutch shots, and he hoped that would give him enough capital to secure a multi-year deal with the Lakers.

Instead, he had been left wondering his literal value as a free agent to the Lakers. Multiple reports, including those from The Times' Broderick Turner, indicated the Lakers didn't want to pay Fisher any more than $2.5 million for one season, a decline from the $5.048 million he had been making in the Lakers' 2009-2010 championship season. So there Fisher sat in a swank South Beach hotel hearing Heat owner Micky Arison and Team President Pat Riley make their case on why Fisher should join the newly assembled "Super Team."

Nothing ever came of that meeting. Fisher flew back to Los Angeles less than 24 hours after landing in Miami and eventually signed a three-year, $10.5-million deal with the Lakers.  Many in the organization thought privately that there would be no way Fisher would leave the Lakers, considering they drafted him in 1996, that Fisher has strong ties to Kobe Bryant, has a legacy mostly cemented in L.A. and has a long attachment to the city. Fisher, who insisted he wanted to keep "all options open" during the free-agency process, conceded at least that perception remained.

"I think there was an assumption that I was just going to re-sign with the Lakers before the process even started," Fisher acknowledged shortly after re-signing with the Lakers. "I wanted to make sure that all the teams I spoke with understood I consider myself a full free agent and I'm not handicapping myself to one place."

But suppose Fisher decided otherwise? His "decision" would've affected many moving parts within the Lakers and Heat that would have changed the landscape of the NBA season.

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1. Laker fans would remain divided in blaming the Lakers' organization and Fisher. 

Laker fans are already divided about Fisher's worth to the team. Some, including myself, have believed any of Fisher's declining abilities (athleticism, defense, shooting) are overblown and offset by some of his positive traits (locker room presence, clutch shot-making, team spokesman, challenger to Bryant). Some believe all those qualities are simply exaggerated. If there's this much division over Fisher's worth to the team, just imagine what would have happened had he left.

Some would fault Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak for letting a five-time NBA champion, Kobe Bryant's confidant and a veteran presence get away. Some would blame Fisher for overly inflating his market value and worth to the team. Some would praise Kupchak for understanding the need to let go of an aging player, no matter how valuable he once was. And some would praise Fisher for standing up for himself even if it came at the expense of leaving the Lakers for the second time in his career.  

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2. Bryant would have entered 2010 training camp pretty angry.

During each day of the free-agency process, Fisher kept Bryant in the loop surrounding each development. Their relationship stems to when the Lakers drafted them in 1996, where the two often practiced against each other, came to blows with one another and equally admired each other's work ethic and determination even if Bryant has proven to be the most talented. 

Both accounts from Bryant and Fisher say that Bryant never put any overt pressure on Fisher to stay with the Lakers. Instead, they say, Bryant acted more as a sounding board for the day-to-day concerns and frustrations Fisher went through during the free-agency process. But it's clear Bryant played a role in Fisher coming back. Bryant, in his interview with reporters in early July, said six different times that the Lakers need to make any necessary concessions to keep Fisher. In his statement, Fisher said: "At the end of the day, there's one person I could not turn away from. Kobe Bryant asked me to stay but supported whatever decision I made."

Had Fisher decided otherwise, Bryant would've entered training camp in a pretty sour mood. Because of how close Bryant and Fisher are, I doubt Fisher's desire to go to Miami would've severely soured his relationship with Bryant. He likely would have directed more of his anger toward Kupchak, who had already received unfavorable reviews during Bryant's infamous trade demands in 2007.

It's hard to argue the Lakers would have missed Fisher's playoff presence because that was mostly absent this season, in addition to his usual struggles. Fisher's teammates may respect him for his continued efforts to provide a locker-room presence, aiding Bryant's leadership role and delivering Jackson's team message, but their unwillingness to follow the lead of Jackson, Bryant and Fisher show that his job  proved more difficult for him this season than in years past. But had Fisher been gone from the Lakers, Bryant and Jackson would've had an even more difficult time trying to get everyone else to keep the proper focus and mindset in getting a three-peat. The problems that led to the Lakers getting swept by the Dallas Mavericks in the Western Conference semifinals would've been exposed even earlier.

475161463. The Lakers would have had more urgency in bolstering their backcourt.

The Lakers have long maintained their need to improve their backcourt, but it never came at the expense of trading Fisher. In addition to the qualities I described above, one of Fisher's skills involved running the triangle properly. Since Jackson had already decided he'd stay for another season before Fisher reached an agreement with the Lakers, his arrival with Miami wouldn't have changed the Lakers' offensive system. But it would have prompted them to fill their backcourt at a much quicker rate.

Keep in mind that Lakers guard Jordan Farmar had already decided to sign a four-year, $12-million deal with the New Jersey Nets before Fisher would have resigned with the Lakers. So that would have moved up Steve Blake to assume the starting role, a dicey move considering how uncomfortable Blake felt playing with both the starters and reserve unit as Fisher's backup. But it may have pushed Kupchak to put more emphasis in securing Raja Bell, who ultimately chose the Utah Jazz. It may have prevented Kupchak from trading Sasha Vujacic to the New Jersey Nets for Joe Smith, a move that mainly addressed the team finances. The trade, in which the Nets also sent Terrence Williams to Houston, allowed the Lakers to take Vujacic's $5.5 million off the books and absorb Smith's $1.4-million salary. And Fisher's departure would've given Kupchak more reason to make a trade before the Feb. 24 deadline.

6a00d8341c506253ef0133f2622660970b-320wi4. Miami would have handled the media scrutiny with a lot more maturity

I usually would have remarked that Fisher's playoff experience would have come in handy. He would have commanded immediate respect within the Heat's locker room because of his five championship rings. With that, there would have been a lot of episodes that Miami could have easily avoided. Fisher would have explained to James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh that it would be a bad idea to have a WWE-type player introduction in which they would talk about "winning multiple championships." He would remind everyone that going through a title run is supposed to be difficult and that they shouldn't shy away from all the scrutiny and pressure. And as president of the National Basketball Players Assn, Fisher certainly would've educated his teammates enough about the impending lockout that James wouldn't suggest that it'd be good if the league contracted teams. 

Whether that would have resulted in an NBA championship is too hard to say simply because Dallas proved to be a formidable opponent. But Miami's chemistry would have forged a lot quicker at the beginning of the season and the Heat wouldn't have been as consumed with the sideshows, such as their public perception, the outcry over the revelation that some cried after a regular season game and the distasteful video showing James and Wade mocking Dirk Nowitzki being sick during the Finals.

5. The makeup of Miami's backcourt would've been different.

As The Times' Mike Bresnahan and Turner reported at the time, the Heat hoped Fisher would be their starting point guard.  But it would have been hard to determine how much Miami would have offered him and what Fisher would have accepted considering they added plenty of players to their roster. Consider the terms the Heat reached in acquiring James, Chris Bosh (both of whom signed matching six-year, $110.1-million contracts), Mike Miller (five years for $25 million) and Udonis Haslem (four years for about $20 million) and in retaining Wade (six years for $107.5 million). 

Had Fisher been the Heat's starting point guard, neither Mike Bibby nor Mario Chalmers would have had the same role. It's conceivable Bibby, who began the postseason as the starting point guard, wouldn't have even been in Miami since he was picked up in early March after Washington cut him. The Heat would have preferred that scenario considering Bibby's playoff run proved pretty disappointing (28.1% shooting and 17 turnovers).

Chalmers, meanwhile, started 26 games and proved unafraid of the playoff pressure. As John Krolik pointed out recently in ESPN.com's Heat Index, his play came with both extremes. The good: Chalmers made timely three-pointers and jumpers, played pesky defense and thrived on making the big play. The bad: Chalmers made plenty of mistakes with head-scratching fouls, questionable passes and occasionally ill-advised turnovers. Had Fisher played with the Heat, he would've provided a much better alternative to Bibby and Fisher's stabilizing presence would've provided the perfect counter to Chalmers' energy.

--Mark Medina

E-mail the Lakers blog at [email protected]

Photo: Lakers guard Derek Fisher reflects on the season as he answers reporters' questions about the Lakers season ending and his future with the team at the Laker's practice facility in El Segundo on Tuesday. Credit: Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times

Photo: Kobe Bryant prepares to give Fisher a hug after Fisher introduced the Lakers' All-Star guard during the 2010 ring ceremony at Staples Center. Credit: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

Photo: Fisher and his wife, Candace, celebrate on the court of Staples Center after the Lakers' Game 7 victory over Boston in the 2010 NBA Finals. Credit: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

Photo: Had Fisher gone to Miami, it's likely General Manager Mitch Kupchak would have made moves to bolster the Lakers' backcourt. Credit: Richard Hartog / Los Angeles Times

Photo: Had Fisher joined the Miami Heat, he surely would have advised James not to declare the Heat would win "multiple championships." Credit: Hans Dery / Reuters

Photo: Heat reserve guard Mario Chalmers gets a high-five from forward LeBron James after hitting a shot in the second half of Game 3 in Dallas. Credit: LM Otero / Associated Press

 
Comments () | Archives (30)

The comments to this entry are closed.


@ALEKSAM ... You have to remember that certain bloggers refuse to acknowledge Drew’s value or contribution to the team because they fear that Drew might steal some of Kobe’s shots and glory. That’s why they create these fantasies that blame everything on Drew, who really was the only Lakers player who showed up for the playoffs. Give them a little more rope and Pau will come out a hero.
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LAKERTOM

i know that we will be going through woulda/coulda/shoulda at least until next season assuming no lock out, but i will find it interesting to hear from d-fish bashers as to what this team would have looked like without him.first remember though that without fish, there would no one to balance out kobe's persona and impact in the locker room and in general. it would just been a different culture regardless if it would be better or worse

@ALEKSAM ... You have to remember that certain bloggers refuse to acknowledge Drew’s value or contribution to the team because they fear that Drew might steal some of Kobe’s shots and glory. That’s why they create these fantasies that blame everything on Drew, who really was the only Lakers player who showed up for the playoffs. Give them a little more rope and Pau will come out a hero.
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LAKERTOM

Posted by: Tom Wong | June 15, 2011 at 08:26 AM

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it's not about stealing shots and glory.


@ALEKSAM ... You have to remember that certain bloggers refuse to acknowledge Drew’s value or contribution to the team because they fear that Drew might steal some of Kobe’s shots and glory. That’s why they create these fantasies that blame everything on Drew, who really was the only Lakers player who showed up for the playoffs. Give them a little more rope and Pau will come out a hero.
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LAKERTOM

Posted by: Tom Wong | June 15, 2011 at 08:26 AM

--------------

it's not about stealing shots and glory.

Posted by: soshibo | June 15, 2011 at 08:43 AM

__________


No, it’s all about the "Q" and it has been very well documented. Why Lakers fans refuse to acknowledge this simple concept is beyond me.

http://gotemcoach.com/post/4997107611/you-know-how-andrew-bynum-walks-and-it-always

http://sportsillustrated.asia/vault/article/magazine/MAG1184609/1/index.htm

The young Center will always have problems in the league so if an opportunity presents itself to allow another team to take a chance... The team has received all their about to get from Andrew before he inevitably goes down again. That's how he plays his game: with caution. Anyway, this topic has been beaten to death. It's not that he doesn't have talent, potential and hasn't been a force on the team. It's all about his propensity to getting injured. He's not clumsy nor is he accident prone. It's all about the "Q Angle," hence the word "propensity." If Howard wants to play for the Lakers, then Jim has to "sign off" on it, PERIOD!


@SOSHIBO & FRMKT ... My comments were not in reference to trading Drew for Dwight. They were specifically in reference to another blogger’s posts blaming Drew for the Lakers not winning their third championship in a row and exonerating Kobe for any blame.
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LAKERTOM


@Gregg 5 – Excellent point about Cuban never stopped spending while Dr. Buss went into a cost containment mode.


@MM –It’s a good point that Fisher would’ve helped Miami avoid some of the faux pas throughout the season, but I think Miami had already had the “championship celebration” before Fisher made his decision…so he couldn’t have impacted that. Plus, Riley was there and didn’t stop it.

LRob

Lance - You make a good point and it's something I harp on all the time. I feel like it falls on deaf ears though because it seems like there's very little appreciation for the nuance he brings to the table. Team dynamics are a hugely important variable. While I think Phil, Kobe and Fish equally struggled last season in getting everyone to buy in this year, I think it's more an indictment on the rest of the team than them. However, I think some of the problems the Lakers showed against Dallas would've been exposed more quickly if Derek wasn't there trying to hold things together.

this was written:

You have to remember that certain bloggers refuse to acknowledge Drew’s value or contribution to the team because they fear that Drew might steal some of Kobe’s shots and glory. That’s why they create these fantasies that blame everything on Drew, who really was the only Lakers player who showed up for the playoffs. Give them a little more rope and Pau will come out a hero.

my response: really?

What fantasy blames everything on Bynum? I don't recall one story that
blamed *EVERYTHING* on Bynum.

re: stealing some of Kobe's shots & glory. WTH? Some extremely knowledgable
people have clearly articulated what happens when the offense doesn't
run through Kobe. i.e. The rest of the Lakers don't have space to shoot
because they can't create their own shots. And it should be clear that ball
movement without player movement doesn't work in creating shots for
slow people.

You'd think that someone who coaches and has played the game would
have figured this out by now. Maybe that's why he's coaching 10 yr olds.

re: showing up for the playoffs. So ... LO didn't show up? Kobe didn't show up?


Wow! I guess the universe really does revolve around Bynum.

Can someone give me Bynum's address? I need to drive down to Southern
California and genuflect in his general direction. How foolish of me not to
notice that the only person who showed up was not the guy who was playing
hurt, not the 6th man of the year, not the perenniel all star, but the young
center. Who knew!

Everyone hails D Howard as the savior at center. Dwight is gifted athletically, no doubt, but skill-wise, he's not a huge upgrade. I mean, he STILL has problems making/creating his own shot (which is why he complains so much about being fed). So really, the only reason everyone is pushing for a trade is because of the knees.

Posted by: alekesam | June 15, 2011 at 08:09 AM
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The reason I would love to see Dwight in a Laker uniform is because a) He’s a top 5 player in the league. B) He’s 3 time DPOY. C) He’s expressed interest in playing for the Lakers.

It’s nothing personal against Drew, Pau, LO or anyone else. It’s strictly business.

LRob

Wow! I guess the universe really does revolve around Bynum.

Can someone give me Bynum's address? I need to drive down to Southern
California and genuflect in his general direction. How foolish of me not to
notice that the only person who showed up was not the guy who was playing
hurt, not the 6th man of the year, not the perenniel all star, but the young
center. Who knew!

Posted by: hobbitmage | June 15, 2011 at 09:15 AM

---------------

so full of win... forward me his address and i'll genuflect for you.

btw, i never referenced drew for dwight in any recent blog posts.

*yawn*

Alekesam,

you wrote: I don't know. On the one hand, I can see the whole knee issue, I do. But then on the flip side, Bynum in beast mode is nearly unstoppable. I don't buy that Tyson Chandler was owning Bynum due to the Mavs being able to collapse on 'Drew which was due to our horrid lack of outside shooting. Similarly, I didn't see Tyson Chandler go off on Bynum either.

my response: What is "beast mode" ?

If I saw Bynum drop 30 pts & 10 rebounds on DH, I would consider that a
beastly performance. If I saw Bynum drop 30 pts & 10 rebounds on
Nene, I would consider that beastly. So ... What performances can you
point to that show beastliness. BTW, dropping 30 pts on Amare is not
beastly to me.

re: Tyson Chandler. Tyson Chandler's *role* on the Dallas Mavericks was not
to be a scorer. It was to be a defensive presence in the middle.

Do you know how the +/- number works? If so, please explain how
Bynum has a double-double and his +/- numbers suck.

Btw, game 4 Bynum is 2-7, game 1 3-8. It's game 3 & 4 where he had
reasonable/good numbers [ 18 pts & 10 rebounds ]

re: Chandler/defense collapsing on Bynum. Would you elaborate on this?
[ I'm asking, so we talk about the same things. ]

Ok, PSP jumping into the fray

It really is very simple: You get offered Howard for Bynum, you do it in a heartbeat if you are the Lakers! End of story, no buts no ifs no nothing.

How can you NOT accept an offer like that? I mean, come on! The PSP has NBA league pass (take note Island Priestess) and catch a lot of games over the season. Dwight is head and shoulders above Drew, it's not even close; he even added a Duncan esque bank shot this past season and was hitting it consistently.

And for those bringing up age, Dwight is LESS than 2 years older than Drew. Like the musician LRob and also Don Vito succinctly stated, it's business nothing personal.

Thanks
PSP Intern

so full of win... forward me his address and i'll genuflect for you.

btw, i never referenced drew for dwight in any recent blog posts.

*yawn*

Posted by: soshibo | June 15, 2011 at 09:18 AM

I'm not sure what "full of win" actually means.

I never indicated that you did reference drew for dwight. My post
was in response to a post not yours. have a great day.

Mark Medina

Poll time, would you trade Andrew bynum for Dwight Howard? Make it happen!!

PSP,

you're going to cause LakerTom to go into apoplectic shock! :)

I'm not sure what "full of win" actually means.

I never indicated that you did reference drew for dwight. My post
was in response to a post not yours. have a great day.

Posted by: hobbitmage | June 15, 2011 at 09:45 AM

-----------

your statement about the "universe revolving around andrew" was full of meaning.

the statement drew for dwight was intended for LT. apologies. have a greater day.

>>>That’s why they create these fantasies that blame everything on Drew, who
>>>really was the only Lakers player who showed up for the playoffs

I'd say that's a little over the top. It's the first time recently that Drew showed up for the playoffs HEALTHY.

But do you remember what it was like when Shaq was a Laker? He'd go down on the post AND DEMAND the ball. No Tyson Chandler would push him off the block, or anyone else. No 3 for 8 games or 2 for 7 games or 6 for 13 games. Shaq pretty much ALWAYS shot over 50% for every playoff game, and averaged 35 points a game.

THAT is the sort of effort and strength it takes to overshadow the rest of the team.

Bynum doesn't have it.

I don't blame EVERYTHING on Drew. 15 and 10 was AWESOME. He outplayed Pau, no question. But he could have done more. So he gets SOME of the blame.

>>>...Drew for the Lakers not winning their third championship in a row and
>>>exonerating Kobe for any blame.


And just to be clear, Kobe gets some blame as well. The last minute or so of game 1 vs Dallas he was VERY un-Kobe-like. He had 3 or four mistakes that late in the game (the drive and kick turnover, the play where he tripped (which looked suspiciously like he was tripped by Jason Kidd), a bricked shot, etc).

I think Pau gets the most blame... maybe tied with the Lakers matador guards (OLE!)


@LTLF ... Every loss is a team loss and Drew did not play well all the time but overall I think he played better in the playoffs than any other Laker, especially Pau Gasol.
...
What this is all about is the ridiculous claim being made that the Lakers did not three-peat because of trying to feed the ball to Drew and Pau instead of having Kobe go into attack mode.
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LAKERTOM


LRob - The timing of it made it possible that Fisher could've joined Miami either before or after that charade. So fair enough.

>>>Dwight is gifted athletically, no doubt, but skill-wise, he's not a huge
>>>upgrade. I mean, he STILL has problems making/creating his own shot
>>>(which is why he complains so much about being fed). So really, the only
>>>reason everyone is pushing for a trade is because of the knees.

The knees are a big reason, but not the only one.

Dwight has actually improved his post game quite a bit. He's no longer limited to the dunk and the running hook, which were about his only shots in the 2009 finals.

And Dwight Howard would NEVER let Tyson Chandler push him off the block. He would establish position and stay there like the rock of Gibraltar.

I know fans tend to over-value their own teams' players' skillset, but don't sell Dwight Howard short. He is quite a bit better than Bynum.

""I think there was an assumption that I was just going to re-sign with the Lakers before the process even started," Fisher acknowledged shortly after re-signing with the Lakers. "I wanted to make sure that all the teams I spoke with understood I consider myself a full free agent and I'm not handicapping myself to one place.""

This is a good quote to reference when people bring up the idea of Derek Fisher retiring and taking on an assistant coaching position for the good of the team. Fisher is not about selling himself short. Even after back to back championships and a long career with the Lakers, he was ready to walk away for a better offer. It's a business. Despite his claims, I'll still never believe he had any offers that were more lucrative than the one the Lakers caved in and offered him. Miami didn't have much money to give him and I can't believe any of the unnamed suitors out there were offering him packages of $10 million +.

To answer the question, if Derek Fisher joined the Heat, I don't think there would be much of a difference. Fisher is not a significant upgrade or downgrade from Carlos Arroyo or Mike Bibby. On the Lakers side, the absence of Fisher's leadership would have been listed as the main culprit for the Lakers not threepeating.

"Ok, PSP jumping into the fray

It really is very simple: You get offered Howard for Bynum, you do it in a heartbeat if you are the Lakers! End of story, no buts no ifs no nothing.

How can you NOT accept an offer like that? I mean, come on! The PSP has NBA league pass (take note Island Priestess) and catch a lot of games over the season. Dwight is head and shoulders above Drew, it's not even close; he even added a Duncan esque bank shot this past season and was hitting it consistently.

And for those bringing up age, Dwight is LESS than 2 years older than Drew. Like the musician LRob and also Don Vito succinctly stated, it's business nothing personal.

Thanks
PSP Intern

Posted by: Practice Season Police | June 15, 2011 at 09:37 AM "

Yes and that's no knock on Bynum. If you are any team in the league and you can trade your center for Dwight Howard, you do it without hesitation.

His ability to create a shot is often criticized because he doesn't have guard-like offensive skills to match his guard-like athleticism but he puts it in with more efficiency than just about any center out there. The only centers that can really create shots better than him are the power forwards that play as centers like Pau, Nene, Horford, and Amar'e but none of them can collective offensive rebounds and putbacks like Dwight can and none of them are even close to him defensively.

The only areas Bynum is better are from mid-range and the free throw line. Mid range is negligible because neither shoots very often from that distance and the difference between their free throw percentage is suprisingly small (66% vs 60%) considering how much ridicule Dwight gets for his free throws.

Derek's post-season performance was so uncharacteristic. Being the players' representative at the ongoing CBA negotiations might have presented more distraction that he is willing to admit. Even if he went to MIA, that distraction would have followed him there and still affect his post-season.

Without Fisher we could of had a decent guard and most probably made it to the Finals.


Meami would of lost in first or secound round with Fish!!!!

"Derek's post-season performance was so uncharacteristic. Being the players' representative at the ongoing CBA negotiations might have presented more distraction that he is willing to admit. Even if he went to MIA, that distraction would have followed him there and still affect his post-season.

Posted by: The Snake | June 15, 2011 at 11:06 AM "

He really wasn't any different from previous years. You could actually make an argument that he was better statistically this year than in previous years. People remember the game against Boston, the game against Orlando, the 0.4 but there were a lot of games in between that were just like what we saw this year.

It hasn't been all flowers for Fisher in the playoffs. He shot around 30% and got destroyed by Aaron Brooks and the Rockets in 2009. He shot 18% from 3 against Boston in 2010. Playoffs or not, he's a roleplayer. Unless he has opportunities to make big shots at the end of games, he's not going to have performances that anyone will remember.

Pure Speculation, but still fun. Hey its the Offseason.

@Bay to LA, I think it was more than just what the stats show. There was no Derek exhorting his teammates in the huddle or organizing a players-only meeting to dig themselves out of a hole. The Derek of previous post-seasons would have been the one to thump Pau on the chest instead of PJ. He usually ratchets up his energy level up a notch during the playoffs and it just wasn't there this year.

Maybe all this speculation of mental and physical fatigue may have some credence, after all.

"@Bay to LA, I think it was more than just what the stats show. There was no Derek exhorting his teammates in the huddle or organizing a players-only meeting to dig themselves out of a hole. The Derek of previous post-seasons would have been the one to thump Pau on the chest instead of PJ. He usually ratchets up his energy level up a notch during the playoffs and it just wasn't there this year.

Maybe all this speculation of mental and physical fatigue may have some credence, after all.

Posted by: The Snake | June 15, 2011 at 01:19 PM "

I remember people praising his huddles at times during these playoffs. Specifically in one of the games against New Orleans.

I think it's more about people remembering him being better than he was. To me he looked the same as he always has.

I think Drew for Howard is not much change. A little better defensively a litter less offensively. The nee is back court PG mainly and quick younger athletic player with outside shot and long arms.


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