Lakers Now

Round-the-Clock Purple and Gold

« Previous Post | Lakers Now Home | Next Post »

Phil Jackson says Kobe Bryant's sprained left ankle "still affects him a lot"

Photo: Lakers guard Kobe Bryant dunks during the second half of the Lakers' 106-90 victory over the New Orleans Hornets in Game 5 of the Western Conference quarterfinals Tuesday at Staples Center. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times For Kobe Bryant, the three-day stretch between the Lakers' first-round series against New Orleans and their Western Conference semifinal matchup against Dallas couldn't come soon enough.

For the last three games, Bryant played through the pain of a sprained left ankle and has had additional treatment beyond what he already received on his surgically repaired right knee. The lasting images might be Bryant's one-handed dunk over Emeka Okafor and his 19-point performance in Game 5 after refusing to get an MRI exam and X-rays on his ankle, but the reality behind closed doors reveals that his managing pain will be a playoff-long effort.

"It still affects him a lot," Lakers Coach Phil Jackson said of Bryant, who sat out of Saturday's practice. "This is not going to go away anytime soon so we're just going to have to be close to what he's doing and monitor it a lot. He'll have a limited amount of practice time and it's something he'll have to do."

Bryant acknowledged the extra time with the recovery process, but predictably shot down any suggestion that the ankle is adversely affecting him.

"I'm fine," said Bryant, who sprained his ankle in the final minutes of the Lakers' Game 4 loss to New Orleans and received what he called "around the clock" treatment on his ankle since that time. "I finished off Game 4 fine, played Game 5 fine and Game 6 fine."

Of course, Bryant's response is to be expected considering his reluctance in talking openly about his injuries and making it clear his determination will help him make any adjustments necessary. But his health will still center on the Lakers' success or failure, much like it did in the first-round series against New Orleans.

""It's tender to the touch still," Jackson said of Bryant's sprained ankle. "He's still limping when he walks. It's a limited amount of improvement."

--Mark Medina

E-mail the Lakers blog at [email protected]

Photo: Lakers guard Kobe Bryant dunks during the second half of the Lakers' 106-90 victory over the New Orleans Hornets in Game 5 of the Western Conference quarterfinals Tuesday at Staples Center. Credit: Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times 

 
Comments () | Archives (12)

The comments to this entry are closed.

You say that the series going to a game 7 last year DECREASES the chances of it happening this year and that is absolutely false. They are completely unrelated events. If you flip a regulation coin 5 times and get heads 5 times, you still have a 50/50 chance of getting a heads the first time. You're not "due" to receive a tails just because it hasn't happened in a while.

Why would I want to discredit Phil's record? The problem with putting such a heavy emphasis on historical records is it does not tie in the present in any way. It assumes that all of his threepeat teams were created equal and face a similar level of competition. If his current team is worse than any of the threepeat teams or the matchups or competition they face is greater, it throws it all out the window.

I appreciate that you admit you rely on data that fuels your optimism. That is all I was trying to get you to see all along.

Posted by: Bay to LA | April 30, 2011 at 03:04 PM
======

Historically, there have been consecutive 7 game series in the NBA Finals three (3) times: '49 & '50, '54 & '55 and '69 & '70. That's it. I suppose that if you believe in the Law of Averages, we're overdue. WAY overdue! That would be nice. Strictly from a statistical standpoint, without logic or reason, it is much more likely not to happen than it is to happen. That's why having a 7 game series last year in the Finals statistically DECREASES the chance of it happening this year. I actually hope it does happen. There is nothing better than a Game 7 in the NBA Finals! How many times did you re-watch it?

I disagree with you about this statement: "The problem with putting such a heavy emphasis on historical records is it does not tie in the present in any way." The truth is that it already has. Once again, PJ's team won Game 3 after being tied 1-1 and won the series (12-0 in that situation now). Once again, he closed out on the road in a Game 6 .. for the sixth consecutive time with THIS team. That is an historical trend. This "present" core group of players have been together for four (4) championship runs. You don't just toss that out the window and say that the three previous runs "does not tie into the present in any way." Of course it does. Never mind the experience that Phil Jackson draws from after three-peating on 3 prior occasions, Kobe Bryant and Derek Fisher also have experience to draw from. Of course that ties into the present.

By comparing PJ's three-peat regular season records all season long, I showed you a similarity of all those teams. In the end, 2 of them had 57-25 records, one went 58-24 and one was 62-20. Each and every one of those teams had at least one playoff series where they did NOT have HCA. This team, should it be so fortunate, is tracking just like the 1998 Bulls, who had HCA all the way until the NBA Finals, where they relinquished that to Utah. The Bulls won in 6.

I grasp your "every season is different and every team is different" counter to the numbers I have put out there. You choose to throw the historical data out the window; I choose to marvel at Phil Jackson's enormous success to fuel my optimism. There are no guarantees. That's why they play the games. I'm glad you got me to admit that. I didn't know I had it in me.

P.S.- You're not an engineer, are you?

Bay to LA

Of note, if you want to compare 2 playoff series for HCA purposes, let's look at the Spurs-Grizzlies and Lakers-Hornets series. Neither the Spurs or Lakers wound up having any home court "advantage" in the end because both series ended in 6 games, meaning that 3 games were played on each court. By losing Game 1, in essence the Lakers relinquished any advantage they may have had if the Hornets had simply held serve. In the Spurs case, losing Game 1 proved to be catastrophic because the Grizzlies did hold serve.

To have that home court advantage, you still have to take care of your home court as you pointed out. Last year, the Lakers did just that in the West and then finally gave up HCA to the Celtics in the NBA Finals when they lost Game 2. We then revert back to the Phil Jackson Game 3 phenomena. In 2009, the Lakers handed HCA back to both Houston and Denver. We again revert back to the Game 3 phenomena! While obviously your point is well taken, the advantage really manifests itself the most if you happen to reach Game 7 OR if you win the first 2 games at home, in which case in NBA history, a team leading 2-0 in a best-of-seven series goes on to win that series 93.9 percent of the time. Otherwise, if it's tied at 1-1, you better be pretty damn good at winning Game 3 on the road because in NBA history, teams up 2-1 in a best-of-seven series go on to win that series 82.1 percent of the time!

So let's take Games 1 and 2 vs. Dallas and relax a bit. Even if we don't, they are the exception to these rules anyway. Remember 2006 vs. the Heat? I do.

have a question - if the "curse of the Queens" will prevent Bibby or Peja from reaching the promised land, then tell me again why would we want Adelman as our coach?

Posted by: justanothermambafan | April 30, 2011 at 04:44 PM
=====

So we can blame him if we don't win it! We really wouldn't, justa. I take it back. I'm glad you like The Curse though!

DR:

phred

I think Pau has trouble with guys built like Landry and Baby. They shorter, have strong lower bodies, and are at least as quick if not quicker than Pau. On the offensive end they give Pau trouble because 1) he can't back them down due to their lower body strength, and 2) they're quick enough to stay in front of Pau. On the defensive end, Pau has trouble staying in front of them.

@Lew – you know I’m rolling on the bus (although I think it’ll take 6). Sorry Cubes, your Mavs are on the tracks and the Laker Express is smoking thru.


@mclyne – congrats on your sister nuptials. Beautiful song selection for the wifey!

The look on Pau's face when he peeked through the door at the 36 second mark was the best part of the video!!

man, the team will suffer if kobe refuses to admit his real health condition.
he should undergo examinations to the best of the team.

i think that Kobe can really pull anything off as long as u belive in ur self thats all.

It would be really cool if this was all an act that Phil devised with Kobe as a going away mind game. It is classic how Kobe says one thing and Phil says the other. Then when we are champions Kobe says I told you it was okay. Phil heads into the sunset having blown everyone's mind one last time.

"Historically, there have been consecutive 7 game series in the NBA Finals three (3) times: '49 & '50, '54 & '55 and '69 & '70. That's it. I suppose that if you believe in the Law of Averages, we're overdue. WAY overdue! That would be nice. Strictly from a statistical standpoint, without logic or reason, it is much more likely not to happen than it is to happen. That's why having a 7 game series last year in the Finals statistically DECREASES the chance of it happening this year. I actually hope it does happen. There is nothing better than a Game 7 in the NBA Finals! How many times did you re-watch it?

I disagree with you about this statement: "The problem with putting such a heavy emphasis on historical records is it does not tie in the present in any way." The truth is that it already has. Once again, PJ's team won Game 3 after being tied 1-1 and won the series (12-0 in that situation now). Once again, he closed out on the road in a Game 6 .. for the sixth consecutive time with THIS team. That is an historical trend. This "present" core group of players have been together for four (4) championship runs. You don't just toss that out the window and say that the three previous runs "does not tie into the present in any way." Of course it does. Never mind the experience that Phil Jackson draws from after three-peating on 3 prior occasions, Kobe Bryant and Derek Fisher also have experience to draw from. Of course that ties into the present.

By comparing PJ's three-peat regular season records all season long, I showed you a similarity of all those teams. In the end, 2 of them had 57-25 records, one went 58-24 and one was 62-20. Each and every one of those teams had at least one playoff series where they did NOT have HCA. This team, should it be so fortunate, is tracking just like the 1998 Bulls, who had HCA all the way until the NBA Finals, where they relinquished that to Utah. The Bulls won in 6.

I grasp your "every season is different and every team is different" counter to the numbers I have put out there. You choose to throw the historical data out the window; I choose to marvel at Phil Jackson's enormous success to fuel my optimism. There are no guarantees. That's why they play the games. I'm glad you got me to admit that. I didn't know I had it in me.

P.S.- You're not an engineer, are you?

Posted by: KobeMVP888 | April 30, 2011 at 04:47 PM"

The law of averages doesn't really apply to whether or not a game 7 will happen in a series. It depends on how evenly matched the two teams are. They are completely independent events. It works the same as my coin flip analogy. A coin has a 50/50 chance of landing on heads, but if you flip once and get a heads, you still have a 50/50 chance of receiving a heads on the next flip. If you do it 100 times, you'll likely end up with about 50 of each but from flip to flip, the odds do not change. If two evenly matched teams face each other in the finals, a 7th game could actually become very likely.

As for the 6 game win on the road against the Hornets, I thought it had a lot more to do with the fact that the Lakers are a much better team than the Hornets. That is what that stat requires in order to continue. His team has to be better than the other teams.

I am not throwing historical facts out the window but I prefer stats that tie in the present. Phil has those records for being nearly unbeatable once his team gets the lead or gains control but if Michael Jordan, Shaquille, Kobe, or another one of his key contributors had been lost for the series after a game 3, your stats would say his team is still equally as likely to win. That's where I think those stats fall short. If his players are all healthy but his team plays an opponent that is tougher than any team he has ever faced, those stats are also unreliable. If those stats were solely based on Phil's work and didn't require his teams to be better than the other teams, Jerry Buss could have saved a lot of money last offseason.

I dont feel like i should be forced to have health insurance, I think everyone would like to have health insurance if they could afford it. If you need affordable health insurance search online "Penny Health Insurance" or you dont want to be with out insurance any time.

I think Pau has trouble with guys built like Landry and Baby. They shorter, have strong lower bodies, and are at least as quick if not quicker than Pau.


Connect

Advertisement

In Case You Missed It...

Video

All Things Lakers »

Your database for all things purple and gold.

Find a Laker

Search a name

Select a season

Choose one of our lists



Categories


Archives
 

About the Bloggers


Bleacher Report | Lakers

Reader contributions from Times partner Bleacher Report

More Lakers on Bleacher Report »



Get Alerts on Your Mobile Phone

Sign me up for the following lists:


In Case You Missed It...