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Andrew Bynum misguided for simply thinking he committed a hard foul against Michael Beasley

The replay presented enough evidence for Lakers center Andrew Bynum to apologize to Minnesota forward Michael Beasley.

As Beasley cut toward the baseline, Bynum stepped in on help defense, extended his right forearm and sent Beasley to the ground. Bynum wouldn't comment on the incident after his flagrant foul type 2 earned him an ejection in the Lakers' 106-98 victory last week over the Minnesota Timberwolves. Nor would he say anything publicly about the incident until following Wednesday's practice after serving a two-game suspension. But seeing the highlight at least convinced Bynum enough he needed to say something to Beasley.

"I just sent him a text saying it was my fault and just seeing if he was all right," Bynum said of Beasley, who left the game because of an injured left hip but didn't miss any games afterwards. "Just because of the way he fell when he watched the replay. I didn't want the guy to get hurt."

But that's the only extent to which Bynum really felt any remorse, a shame considering this incident really should've been a teachable moment for the 23-year-old center. It should've highlighted better understanding on knowing the difference between playing tough and playing off emotions. Instead Bynum revealed after Wednesday's practice that Lakers Coach Phil Jackson and the team didn't address him at all about the foul. He strongly disagreed with the suspension. And he said he took nothing away of the incident other than using the time to improve his leg strength with rubber band exercises, squats, shuttle runs and calf raises.

"I got rest," Bynum said. "That's really it."

But it really isn't. The main question surrounding his return in the Lakers' (51-20) game Friday against the Clippers (28-44) hardly involves how he'll phase back into the lineup. They expect he can duplicate the 13 rebounds and 2.58 blocks per game he averaged since the All-Star break. Jackson said there wouldn't be an integration process, joking "this isn't Little Rock" where in 1957 Little Rock Central School slowly integrated African American students. Lakers guard Kobe Bryant laughed when saying Bynum's conditioning will be fine after missing two games because he's "12 years old." And Lakers forward Pau Gasol expressed delight that he doesn't have to log heavy minutes like he did in the past two games, including 52 in the Lakers' 139-137 triple overtime victory Tuesday over the Phoenix Suns.

But what's most worrisome about Bynum is his refusal to acknowledge his own frustration, something Jackson even conceded despite spending the last week passionately questioning the league's ruling.

"He carried a play from one end of the court to the other," Jackson said, referring to Bynum being called for an offensive foul on the previous possession. "We tried to talk to guys about that and that it's not important to do. Basketball is such a game that you have to let things go and move on to the next."

Bynum's only other flagrant foul entailed a hit on Gerald Wallace two years ago that sent him to the hospital. Bynum also often plays with an even-keeled attitude. So this previous incident won't suddenly morph Bynum into an enforcer. But with the Lakers barely a month away from the playoffs, Bynum needs to ensure he doesn't duplicate what he did to Beasley. Even if Bryant argued Bynum "earned his stripes" by wrongfully arguing he just committed a hard foul, Bynum needs to meet that newfound growth with responsibility. Instead, Bynum seems indifferent about it.

"I don't think what I did was deserving of it," Bynum said. "I don't think I did anything too wrong. It was unfortunate the guy fell the way he did and got hurt. At the end of the day, fouls happen. They tell us when the guy falls down, that's going to make it even worse. if he didn't leave the game or get hurt, it probably would've been different."

Not quite. The NBA rulebook actually states that their guidelines go beyond the severity of an opposing player's injury. Although that is a variable, the league office, according to NBA rules, also considers these factors as well in determining in determining whether to classify a foul flagrant 1 or 2, reclassify the flagrant foul and impose a fine and/or suspension: "how hard the foul was; the outcome of the foul (e.g., whether it led to an altercation)." Even if the Lakers argue Bynum wasn't trying to hurt Beasley, his body language suggested otherwise. He swung at Beasley with his right forearm at an angle showing he had  no intention of swatting the ball away and every intention of leveling him.

"It was not a basketball play," Stu Jackson, in charge of player discipline as the NBA's executive vice president of basketball operations, told The Times' Mike Bresnahan, a reason why the league actually considered a three-game suspension. "There was a chance for Bynum to make a basketball play, but he led with his forearm on a play that was both dangerous and reckless because the player, [Michael] Beasley, was vulnerable in the air with no defense. The result of all of this was Beasley was injured and had to leave the game."

It's hard to say whether Bynum's argument that he did nothing wrong reflects his true thinking or if he just wants to put the issue behind him. But whether Bynum wants to admit it or not, he'll need to learn from this quickly.  Other opposing players will surely test whether his bolstered toughness is legitimate. The officiating will likely change from series to series, perhaps even game to game. And there will be plenty of moments that will test his emotions. 

"You have to think about it and you end up having to reflect on it," Jackson said. "He's an intelligent young man."

Hopefully for the Lakers, Bynum actually did that, an unsure sign considering his public comments suggest otherwise.

--Mark Medina

E-mail the Lakers blog at [email protected]

 
Comments () | Archives (65)

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"if he didn't leave the game or get hurt, it probably would've been different."

I agree with Andrew on this phrase.

How many times other guys shove Kobe when he went to the hoop, but because he doesn't get hurt the refs never call a flagrant.

Do you remember Pietrus in GM4 Finals 2009, in the end of the game when Pau was going to dunk he shoved him, if haven't grabbed the hoop probably he would have got really hurt.

This is like in soccer, similar fouls but with different outcomes result in different punishment. Sometimes some plays result in broken legs and others don't but overall all the plays had the same intention.


Nonetheless Andrew needs to keep the mouth shut because this is the way media works. Don't give the refs reasons to punish you.

I think Andrew will handle this with a dominating performance, that's the only way he can answer media and his haters.



Whatever..............

Game Day! Time to get busy.

I love it when I get to a post early and don't have to weed through the trash talking and garbage posters!

It will be interesting to see if AB can contain himself with Blake leaping all over the place. The refs will have their antenna up for anytime AB touches anyone. It will be a frustrating game for Andrew and the Lakers because of the shadow of Darth Stearn'as influence on the game. At least Davis is no longer around to get under their skin with his incessant trash talking garbage.

Besides the obvious rooting for the Lake Show, I will be curious to see if Memphis can do it again tonight. And hope for Portland taking it to the Celts, also! Not very hopeful for Charlotte's chances....... League Pass will be busy on my TIVO tonight!


http://www.nba.com/2011/news/features/scott_howard_cooper/03/24/andrew-bynum-lakers-impact/index.html?ls=iref:nbahpt1

I found it to be an interesting, fairly non-biased article.

11 games left. we have a 1 game cushion of the mavs.

Did y'all know that we've won every championship since I bought the new
TV ? :)

Go Kobe!
Go Lakers!!

Sorry Mark, but I agree with Bynum.

The suspension was excessive, so all that one can learn from this 'teachable moment' is that Stern has a tendency to over-react.

Drew

Just focus, play hard, patrol that paint, and you will be fine. Game Day!!

Thanks
PSP Intern

I still think a percentage of the suspension was from a similar foul on Gerald Wallace two seasons ago. Wallace left with broken ribs. The NBA remembers things like this

When the foul happened, I knew it would result in an ejection. On replay, I told my son he's going to miss a game or two.

What Drew has to learn, something he will in time, is to contest the shot at the top and make it appear legit. Someone taking it hard at you, tries to dunk on you, that is as close to mano-a-mano type action the NBA as there is.

Dribble dancing and breaking your man down on the perimeter are more duels of quickness, speed, skills. Jump shots with a defender on you is all about your lulling your opponent and quick striking them. Dunking on a guy though, that is you-against-I type thing, almost like a boxer trying to slip in a punch. As a big you take it personally.

I just hope this doesn't invite more would-be dunkers to test Drew, he's just gotta learn to be more discrete in sending a message, make your foul count but not cross the line by cross-body blocking, lol.

I hope he watches how Shaq used to do it, he would turn his body so that he'd hit his man with his side if possible, contest up top while giving a nudge to them with his hip - that coupled with is weight and mass would usually knock them to the floor and merely earn a foul. Drews mentor, Cap, I remember him also doing a similar type of move. As wiry as Kareem was it didn't keep him from being physical or be a great shot blocker.

Still though, I'll take the message sent to the league over the two game suspension. That hit will set a tone that will carry over throughout the playoffs, I'm sure those thinking of attacking the basket and Drew will now think twice.


AS ALWAYS - AND FOREVER - GO LAKERS!!!!!!

Bynum was right...it was a hard foul. The severity of it depended largely on how Beasley came down.

The NBA's punishment was over the top when you assess the causes of other two game suspensions prior to this. It also fails the league's own set of standards for the punishment in previous flagrants. The foul did not lead to an altercation, it did not result in any missed time for Beasley either. In fact, I saw him playing last night and he looked fine.

Nevermind that you have guys like Garnett, Rondo, Posey, et al who have committed worse hard fouls and served no suspensions at all.

Nevermind the fact that just two and half weeks ago in OKC, Kobe got leveled to the floor on a late game drive by Serge Ibaka and Thabo Sefolosha. That play not only resulted in no foul call (one of the most horrendous no calls I've seen in a while), but did not get reviewed by the league either.

whatever.
the only thing i'm mad at him for in that foul, was that he didn't put his arms up. the game is war and it's physical. it is not, and never will be safe. i don't want anyone injured, but i really don't think that Bynum was trying to injure. i'm not against the other team feeling a little pain when they become too aggressive though, not when the guys that i root for are getting hammered without any calls. that's how basketball has been played my entire life. i see no reason to change the game to fit the political motives and reality of the present day.

Good morning all - GAME DAY!!!!

I think AB had a whole week to "think about his actions". He was in time out for two games relegated to watching on tv like the rest of us.

AB hears PJ's words loud and clear - don't take the last play to the other end of the court. But in competition, this happens all the time. He's young and stubborn and I fully expect this will happen again. If D-Fish can level Scola and get suspended - AB will do the same. You just hope nobody get hurt.

All's fair in love annd war!!!

Cheers all - PLG

heck, Stu even says "if they want to, they can make that a flagrant foul one". no one but the shrinking violets who don't think that any violence is permitted, even self defense, thought that the foul was flagrant two, two game suspension material. it WAS bad how Berasley fell. it WAS bad that Drew helped Beasley find his way to the floor using his forearm, but really, it was just a collision that looked a lot worse because Beasley was in the air and the fall was hard. it really wasn't that bloodthirsty of a move, though. it was a late, botched defense move.

I think we've had enough discussion over this incident.

It was a hard foul, a good foul in my opinion, and nothing malicious.

Again, if Beasley wasn't trash talking during the whole game to several Lakers, he wouldn't have wound up on his butt.

Game day, FINALLY!

It's down to the final stretch- time to man up for every single defensive stop and offensive execution!

My first selection of the day:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbcwlH-Qimk

Reds Love Child,

Interesting post. Despite your affection for the Celtics, you don't seem to have any problem criticizing what you think should be criticized and calling the team or players out if needed.

Many fans just take the I love you no matter what approach and even attack others who dare to criticize. Refreshing to see your comments.

Posted by: Art | March 25, 2011 at 08:52 AM
-------------------

Art,

Boston FO (unlike the Lakers) has done a lot to be criticized for....

Signing Sheed to a 2yr 13mil deal was nuts. Anyone who seen him play the season prior to signing with the C's could've told Ainge that. That last year in Detroit he almost never posted up....and mailed in the playoffs vs. Orlando (6pts/6reb in 30 min).

Not re-signing TA was a huge mistake. The defense he played on Lebron and Kobe in the playoffs far exceeded his offensive deficiencies.

Trading Perk....I guess the jury is still out...but he signed for 8mil a yr with OKC. If Boston didn't want to spend that to retain a chance of winning the title then shame on them.

The Lakers haven't made those type of blunders and thus don't warrant criticism. The two moves that I disagreed with I did criticize. Trading Sasha for Joe Smith was purely a salary dump and I didn't like it. Also, I didn't think Theo had anything left and was critical of his signing.

Many here were calling for the Lakers to make drastic changes due to their early season struggles. I didn't agree with that sentiment, but I understood the criticism.

We're still on this topic? Here my lowdown again... It was a dirty play and couldve caused serious injury even a possible career ending injury considering beasley was vulnerable in the air.. This isn't the bad boy pistons era and league won't tolerate such so yes suspension was warranted.. However relatively speaking if u consider how many worst deliberate hits there have been in the past with shorter suspensions NO it wasn't fair

There are other ways to play good tough physical basketball like artest bullying a defender downlow with sheer strength and power or just giving a guy a strong shove or subtle elbow to send a message... Maybe even a malone like kick to the groin or a stockton like elbow going through a pick but you just can't deliberately not go for the ball and hit a guy vulnerable on the air. That's just wrong.

Verdict: bynum guilty as charged! Now let's move on.

Thanks for putting this out MM. I agree completely. All the Laker friends in my orbit think this foul will somehow give Bynum a new level of cred. Everyone wants to compare what he did to something else someone else did and it's not so bad. All wrong.

Andrew is an elite player playing on an elite team. Not only do "we" not play that type of ball, we don't have to play that kind of ball. This flagrant foul more than anything shows that our young center still has some growing up to do emotionally. I'm not pleased it happened but think it will help focus his mental game. Least I'm hoping...

GO LAKERS ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

MM, this horse is long-since dead. Andrew fouled him, Andrew apologized for the hard foul, the league suspended him... and now it's time to move on!

Come on, Blog Czar: We've got a crosstown rivalry in store this evening!

Go Lake Show!

if someone threw a flying elbow at kobe as he was airborne I guarantee you they would have been suspended as well. let's not confuse kobe getting hacked with what bynum did to beasley. there's a difference between being a tough player and being a b****-made player like kevin garnett. what bynum did is closer to the KG side of things and not what we should expect or encourage from our lakers.

also i don't like that he "texted" an apology rather than spoke directly with beasley.

The problem is that Bynum didn't throw his elbow hard enough.

Next time, Andrew, lead with the point of your elbow and not your forearm.

What do we play for? RINGS!!!

Lakers Today... Lakers Tomorrow... Lakers Forever.

GO LAKERS!!!

I didn't get to see the game, but I did watch the replay. It was a hard foul. And the suspension was deserved.

However, whether there was intent is in question.

To use a word from the federal courts, it's got to be "irrefragable" [where do these guys come up with these words?....don't they know how to talk street] to demonstrate intent.

I'll respectfully disagree. I think one game would've been enough, but it was a foul that was unnecessary. I said before that Bynum's foul could be used as a teachable moment and didn't want to talk about that until Bynum spoke to see where his mindset was. Yesterday it was the first time he talked about it. I would've brought up this topic earlier if he had spoken sooner

Big deal. It's not the first flagrant foul that has ever been committed in the history of basketball and if Andrew Bynum gained some experience from this and the NBA learned a little bit from the beast within Bynum, then it's a win-win. Andrew Bynum typically plays under control and rarely displays this kind of conduct despite the fact that he's is constantly hammered with out getting calls on the offensive end, but gets whistled every time he breathes on a smaller player on the defensive end. He has a MUCH higher IQ .. basketball or otherwise .. than he is given credit for and as much as people bash him for not reaching his potential at the ripe old age of 23, he is a lot further along than the upside he was given by NBA scouts before the NBA draft, which was Brendan Haywood (his downside was Michael Olowokandi).

So MM, I couldn't disagree MORE with the premise of your article. Bynum is no dummy and if you think he should simply be a pussy and verbalize that what he did was wrong, then that will make the opposition think he's softer than he's already been made out to be. I'm sure Andrew KNOWS what he did was wrong, so as far as I am concerned, the right thing to do is keep that tucked away in his mind.

Bynum paid his dues with an appropriate 2 game suspension which cost him about $250,000, a penalty that more than fit the crime. The fact is that the slow motion replay exaggerated what actually happened anyway. I am not the least bit concerned that this will have any negative carry over effect; if anything, the young man learned a valuable lesson. Someone please explain to me the difference between what Bynum did to earn a 2 game suspension and what Kevin Garnett did when he deliberately slipped his foot under Channing Frye when Frye was descending from a jump shot. To me, trying to deliberately cause an ankle or knee injury to an opposing player deserved an even more hefty fine, but because he's Kevin Garnett and plays for the Celtics, that filthy thug gets away with stuff like that.

As for reintegrating Bynum into the lineup after a mere 6 day absence, give me a break. Phil Jackson's rotations have never been more consistent than this season and the good that Bynum's absence did was to simulate some mental toughness that will be necessary in close games in the playoffs with that thrilling triple OT win on Tuesday against the Suns. I'm a big fan of clean, aesthetic basketball, but unfortunately that is not the NBA. Unlike any other team in the Association, the Lakers can win playing ANY style of basketball, whether its the triangle in its purest form, lock down switching man to man defense, energetic transition basketball or the Boston Celtics' preferable style of Mixed Martial Arts basketball. Bring it on!

Welcome back, Drew!!!

LOL @Jon K....

Jon it was a pleasure meeting you at the Portland game...

Checking in for game day...Today we get the beast back...

AB is on my FBB team, and the 2 games he missed really killed me on this second week of the playoffs...

But tonight we proceed with our mission...

Lakers Dynasty - The Next Generation...

#17 Coming Up!!! The Friedman Season...

Anyone who doesn't think he deserved to be suspended needs to take the homer glasses off. That was boderline dirty, he deserved to be suspended period. As a huge Bynum fan the silver lining was much needed rest for the knee, and some toughness that will intimidate those driving to the hoop.

I say Drew is right and it was just a hard foul. But in the future if Drew wants to give a hard foul then make some sort of attempt to make it look as if he was playing he ball. If Drew had extended his arm at the ball his body would still have hard fooled Beasly and there would be no flagrant foul called.

Justa

I don't even understand the point of this post. You're re-hashing this just because Drew didn't show MORE remorse?? Even Norm Nixon (who was really critical of the foul on Lakers Live after the game) would probably say "It was a hard foul, Andrew shouldn't have done it, let's move on". Not..."How sorry is Drew and will he learn from his mistakes??"

Do you think that the media in Phoenix were re-hashing the Bell clothesline on Kobe a week after the fact because he didn't show MORE remorse? Do you think the Boston media re-hashed McHale's clothesline on Rambis when HE didn't show MORE remorse?? Contrary to what you, Stu Jackson and David Stern think, basketball is a contact sport. Let Stu and Stern make the game "safe", you don't need to be stoking the fire of less contact and more punishment for Drew!

By the way, I know you weren't saying he should have been punished more, I just think a post like this IS more punishment.

Medina, please stop crying. Beasley isn't crying about it, and neither is Rambis.

Here's a great post from a fellow Lakers fan from another forum that I thought I would share with y'all:
=====

Lakermelody (3/25/2011 at 8:25 AM)

Phil and Kobe are the real MVP's. Look objectively at the Laker roster which the experts call the most talented in the league, and maybe it is.

1. Gasol, before Kobe and Phil, one all-star appearance and one playoff where he was swept. Since, three straight finals and two titles.
2. Fisher, let go by Golden State and in a humanitarian gesture let go by Utah. Considered liability on D. and too old.
3. Odom, let go by Clippers and Miami. Considered enigmatic talent who is inconsistent at best.
4. Bynum, the quintessential project. Mr.Potential which was never reached.
5. Artest, almost out of the NBA. Considered tough but troubled, and maybe not worth the risk.
6. Brown, a throw-in when Lakers get Morrison.
7. Blake, let go by Portland and Clippers.
8. Barnes, he may have been on as many teams as he has years in the league.

It is my contention that all of these players are better than advertised because of the will and work ethic of Kobe Bryant, and the masterful coaching of Phil Jackson. For this reason I give the Lakermelody MVP to Kobe and PJ.

If u look at the review and just use some common sense then clearly you can see that the foul wasn't malicious. He reacted late on the play and jumped late and like most people do... put a forearm out to protect himself (even offensive players do it to create space). If he went straight up into the air and not with the slight twist he did the play wouldn't have looked as bad and Beasley wouldn't have fell the way he did. It happens all the time and only because of the way Beasley landed he was suspended!

Where did my post go?

MM do you read 888's post? This guy is a clown and what is wrong with this blog right now. Anyone who respects this guy must be enamored with schmucky lawyers.

Anyone who doesn’t think Bynum deserved to be suspended needs to take the homer glasses off. That was a borderline dirty foul period. As a huge Bynum fan the silver lining was the rest for the knee and the intimidation for those driving to the hoop on Bynum in the future.

After reading posts for the last two days, I finally saw Drew's transgression on the above replay.
Flagrant 2 is warranted. C'mon Drew, raise your arms up. One of the cheapest shots I've ever seen.
Beasley must be a real prick!

Good article, I agree 100%. I think some of the disconnect is that people might be expecting Stern or Jackson to look at this from a Lakers fan's perspective, meaning Bynum needs to be tough, Beasley was talking a lot and had it coming, so just move on. The league is *supposed* to be impartial and rule in the best interest for the league and the players involved. I think they did just that and if anyone ever commits a similar foul on a Lakers player, I think we all want them to face similar punishment.

More sensationalism from LA reporting. At least it gets mentioned that perhaps he knows it was wrong, but just wants to get past it. That's most likely the case, and I don't blame Drew. Personally, I side with most of the players in that I sort of don't have a problem with what he did. Sure, I wish he tried to block the shot, but sometimes stuff like this happens.

It just so happens that when this occurs in LA, reporters tend to drag a 10 minute story into a 4 day column.

It'll be interesting to see how Blake Griffin fairs tonight against the Lakers. He struggled thus far especially with Pau's length. 19pts/36% against the Lakers vs. 22pts/50% against the rest of the league.

I respect differing opinions, but let me just clarify. This post isn't meant to rehash the whole incident. Yesterday was the first time Bynum has publicly spoken about it so of course I'm going to highlight his comments. I'm not faulting him for not issuing some dramatic mea culpa. I'm faulting him for not using this as a learning tool in knowing how to keep the emotions in check. Bynum doesn't have the reputation of being a dirty player. But I feel like he could respond in two fashions - feeling suddenly empowered by this and using it for the worst or using it as a teachable moment. Again he may be just trying to move on past it, but he's always very honest. He sounded a little too defiant for something that could've proved costly against an actually good team.

Just a few years ago, that play would have been a simple foul but not anymore. The League had to clamp down on defenders from making that type of play because more often than not, it led to fist fights and on occasion injury to the fouled player. I totally agree that Bynum had a chance to make a basketball play on Beasley and should have attempted to block the shot but instead chosed to make what resembled a football play. I'm a Bynum fan because i believe that he will eventually be the top center in basketball but i hope that he learned that nothing good can come from making that type of play.

"heck, Stu even says "if they want to, they can make that a flagrant foul one". no one but the shrinking violets who don't think that any violence is permitted, even self defense, thought that the foul was flagrant two, two game suspension material. it WAS bad how Berasley fell. it WAS bad that Drew helped Beasley find his way to the floor using his forearm, but really, it was just a collision that looked a lot worse because Beasley was in the air and the fall was hard. it really wasn't that bloodthirsty of a move, though. it was a late, botched defense move.

Posted by: mud | March 25, 2011 at 09:52 AM "

Stu is a Lakers commentator, he was just making his best effort to downplay it because he knew it was bad. I've seen a lot of flagrant 2 plays where the player is actually going for the ball but accidentally injures the player in the process. This one was a no-brainer.

If he had at least put his hands up to block the shot he might have been ok but he lowered his shoulder and delivered a hit instead. You can tell by his reaction afterwards that he was frustrated and had lost his cool. It's over and the suspension is already served so it's too late to argue about it, he just needs to learn from it.

More sensationalism from LA reporting. At least it gets mentioned that perhaps he knows it was wrong, but just wants to get past it. That's most likely the case, and I don't blame Drew. Personally, I side with most of the players in that I sort of don't have a problem with what he did. Sure, I wish he tried to block the shot, but sometimes stuff like this happens.

It just so happens that when this occurs in LA, reporters tend to drag a 10 minute story into a 4 day column.

Posted by: Ryan | March 25, 2011 at 10:55 AM

Couldn't agree with you more. Sports reporting in LA was the main factor in the Shaq & Kobe breakup. Never would have happened without fanning the fire by the L.A. sports writers sensationalism.

"It is my contention that all of these players are better than advertised because of the will and work ethic of Kobe Bryant, and the masterful coaching of Phil Jackson. For this reason I give the Lakermelody MVP to Kobe and PJ.


Posted by: KobeMVP888 | March 25, 2011 at 10:45 AM

"

Cudos KobeMVP888! Exactly!

Medina, inconsistent calls by the refs are the real culprits here. Big men take a pounding in this game on a nightly basis and no one calls anything. The shot that warrants a flagrant 2 when committed by Drew in merely another day at the office when the same foul is leveled on him. These guys get pushed and hacked with no attempt at a play on the ball, while jumping nearly every time they attempt a shot under the basket in a hotly contested game. They only manage to keep their feet due to their superior weight. Yes, some guys do complain on every shot attempt regardless, but there is a fair percentage of the time when a call would be justified but is not made. We've all seen it. This why some players occasionally resort to retaliation. I've seen guys hit in the head with no defensive attempt made on the ball and no call. It's a good thing that most NBAs bigs are fairly mild tempered or there would be carnage on the court on a regular basis. If the NBA truly wants to clean this up, it should insure that the games are called in an equitable manner.


Let's go forward and have some fun!!!

SA will probably play next 2 weeks without Duncan So.....if SA loses to the Blazers tonight and the Lakers win, the Lakers will be back ONLY 5 games. SA will play Boston and @Houston back to back game; will play Phoenix and @Atlanta.; and they will play last 2 games @Lakers and @Phoenix back to back. BTW, Houston and Phoenix are fighting for the playoffs so they will play to win desperately. The remaining Lakers schedule games are all "Winnable" games (and some of SA's Winnable games could be offset with LA's Winnable games loss.) Realistically, I believe the Lakers can catch up SA, not that it is really crucial for the Lakers.

SA remaining regular season schedule:
Fri, Mar 25 @Portland (with Loss, 5gb)
Sun, Mar 27 @Memphis W
Mon, Mar 28 vsPortland W
Thu, Mar 31 vsBoston (with Loss, 4gb)
Fri, Apr 1 @Houston (with Loss, 3gb)
Sun, Apr 3 vsPhoenix 1:00 W
Tue, Apr 5 @Atlanta 7:00 (with Loss, 2gb)
w/0 Duncan up to this game?

Wed, Apr 6 vs Sacramento W
Sat, Apr 9 vs Utah W
Tue, Apr 12 @Los Angeles (with Lakers win, 1gb)
Wed, Apr 13 @Phoenix (with loss, tie with SA, but Lakers could win the tiebreaker with better conference record)

How about that!! Lakers, the best record in the NBA for PJ's "Last Stand" and PJ wins COY and Kobe MVP! Well..of course, #17!!!

"Lakermelody (3/25/2011 at 8:25 AM)

Phil and Kobe are the real MVP's. Look objectively at the Laker roster which the experts call the most talented in the league, and maybe it is.

1. Gasol, before Kobe and Phil, one all-star appearance and one playoff where he was swept. Since, three straight finals and two titles.
2. Fisher, let go by Golden State and in a humanitarian gesture let go by Utah. Considered liability on D. and too old.
3. Odom, let go by Clippers and Miami. Considered enigmatic talent who is inconsistent at best.
4. Bynum, the quintessential project. Mr.Potential which was never reached.
5. Artest, almost out of the NBA. Considered tough but troubled, and maybe not worth the risk.
6. Brown, a throw-in when Lakers get Morrison.
7. Blake, let go by Portland and Clippers.
8. Barnes, he may have been on as many teams as he has years in the league.

It is my contention that all of these players are better than advertised because of the will and work ethic of Kobe Bryant, and the masterful coaching of Phil Jackson. For this reason I give the Lakermelody MVP to Kobe and PJ.


Posted by: KobeMVP888 | March 25, 2011 at 10:45 AM "

Playing with Phil and Kobe has helped all of these guys but I think Lakermelody is selling some of the guys short. Even prime Shaq was "let go" by the Magic if signing with another team in free agency = being let go.

1. Gasol was the #1 for that team and I thought they had made the playoffs several times, not once, despite not having any real stars on the team. Lakers were thrilled to be able to get him.
2. Fair enough.
3. The inconsistency part is right but he has always been a talented player. He wasn't "let go" like a Sasha Vujacic, he was a player other teams demanded in trade offers.
4. Fair enough.
5. Almost out of the NBA? He was basically the #1 option for the Rockets in that playoff series.
6. This is true, but he still lacks consistency.
7. Portland had to trade him for a healthy center, Clippers lost him in free agency. He has always been a solid PG which is why the Lakers targeted him.
8. True, but he never runs out of teams willing to sign him.

I see their point, but I don't think they should downgrade players just to make Kobe or Phil look better.

I respect differing opinions, but let me just clarify. This post isn't meant to rehash the whole incident. Yesterday was the first time Bynum has publicly spoken about it so of course I'm going to highlight his comments. I'm not faulting him for not issuing some dramatic mea culpa. I'm faulting him for not using this as a learning tool in knowing how to keep the emotions in check. Bynum doesn't have the reputation of being a dirty player. But I feel like he could respond in two fashions - feeling suddenly empowered by this and using it for the worst or using it as a teachable moment. Again he may be just trying to move on past it, but he's always very honest. He sounded a little too defiant for something that could've proved costly against an actually good team.

Posted by: Mark Medina | March 25, 2011 at 11:04 AM

I definitely respect the opinion of a very good writer (who I obviously follow closely) in that this should be a learning experience. My thoughts are that this HAS indeed been a learning experience for the young big. Whether or not he decides to share with the media his inner feelings on the play is his option.

I just have an issue with assuming we know how Drew has internally assessed the situation. It's hard for me bc as I said before, I sort of like our big finding some empowerment in his size (NOT in his ability to hurt opposing players). How do you think Shaq, in his Lakers hayday, would have responded to a similar suspension? Bynum has regulated the paint pretty well of late, but that's a somewhat new concept for the young man. He went a little overboard on a play, probably recognizes the fact, and now has one more lesson in how to play The Enforcer role. He doesn't need to express this in an interview for me to be confident he gets the idea. Obviously he's a very intelligent guy.

Ugh - this is SO last week already. MM, I totally understand why the post was created in the first place, given Drew's decision yesterday to finally go on record with it, but still...it's a non-topic.
But. I loved that post the KobeMVP888 re-posted from lakermelody - so true!
And onto bigger fish to fry - Blake Griffin and Los Angeles Clippers tonight at Staples!
The Beast is back, hopefully along with the defense, and it's time to march forward in the quest for post ASB perfection, sweeping on, with threshing oar, and with our only goal being western dominance!
"The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new lands
To fight the horde and sing and cry, Valhalla, I am coming"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCvMKcNJCAY&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlNhD0oS5pk

One of the posts today talked about how Shaq used to block shots. This was one of the best posts because it addresses the real issue. Bynum misplayed the block, got caught in an odd position, made contact and pushed off trying to protect himself. Due to the motion of his elbow and how Beasley fell, it got called a flagrant. It might be a little harsh from the league but I understand their position. I just think that most people are overlooking the fact that he really misplayed the block. (Maybe that's why he got the flagrant. They are assuming because he misplayed, he was doing it intentionally. I doubt this, even if he was holding onto emotions.) Beasley was much quicker than I think Bynum expected. And look where he jumps from. All of a sudden, there's no room because Bynum takes that extra step prior to jumping. Also, he starts to bring his arm up but can't because of how sudden Beasley is right next to him. Finally, I think Mark Medina is overblowing this because Phil Jackson definitely talks to the players about emotions and how to manage them during a game. To say that no one from the coaching staff talked to Bynum is silly. Kareem has probably talked to him several times alone about it.

Where did my post go?

MM do you read 888's post? This guy is a clown and what is wrong with this blog right now. Anyone who respects this guy must be enamored with schmucky lawyers.

Anyone who doesn’t think Bynum deserved to be suspended needs to take the homer glasses off. That was a borderline dirty foul period. As a huge Bynum fan the silver lining was the rest for the knee and the intimidation for those driving to the hoop on Bynum in the future.

Posted by: NBA4ever | March 25, 2011 at 10:45 AM
====

Is this guy allowed to call me a "schmucky lawyer" and get away with it?

By the way, NBA4ever, if you are going to call me names, kindly let us know what it was about my post that you objected to. I actually AGREED with you that Bynum deserved a 2 game suspension and I otherwise simply voiced my opinion just like everyone else did on this issue. I didn't argue with anyone, call them any names or, frankly, even address them. This is a topic that there are a wide range of opinions on and I completely respect that. Part of MM's take on it was basically that he felt Drew didn't learn anything from this. I disagree. I think Drew knows exactly what happened, but did the right thing by NOT verbalizing it. Certain things in life are advantageous to just keep to yourself.

An apology for the insulting name calling is in order, don't you think? Just because you happen to hate lawyers doesn't give you the right to call people names and insinuate that it's not a noble profession.

This article is dumb. Sure, Bynum could've handled that play differently but it happens. It wasn't intentional and he'll be just fine. Get over it. Beasly is fine also. Bynum should NOT dwell on what happened 3 games ago. He sent an apology to Beasly and that's the only person he owed an apology to. What does this writer want? For Bynum to apologize to the world? Move on and focus on the next game. He's indiferent because he must focus on tonight's game and prepare for the playoffs!

What about Kevin McHales' closeline on Rambis in the Finals? No ejection or suspension...... Classic example of how the NBA has implemented a zero tollerance policy regarding this issue. All hail Stern the Furor!!

I'm with Bynum.
He layed a hared foul on the guy....he paid the price of ejection and suspension.
The refs have a lot to do with player frustration, and not mentioning their incompetence and putting all responsibility on Drew is short and narrow sited.

The thesis of this post is excellent. I don't know how anyone can watch that replay and think that Drew did not deserve to be suspended, but leaving that question out of it the larger issue is whether this was a teachable moment for Drew. I think it was a teachable moment, and I think he has, thus far, failed.

His public comments since the suspension are somewhat petulant and childish. Again, the issue isn't whether you agree with the decision or not, but how you react. By publicly stating that he doesn't think he did anything wrong, he is laying the groundwork for the NEXT (longer) suspension. Stu Jackson has a long memory, so why tempt fate?

What this also illustrates is another failure of coaching by the Lakers staff. They should have been all over Drew, explaining to him that if he isn't going to take responsibility for the foul, then he should not make any comments at all. Andrew already gets very little love from the officials, which I happen to think is at least partially due to his fairly consistent (and loud and demonstrative) complaining on no-calls. Show the officials and the league a little respect and they might show a little back.

In the end, it might feel good to say "NO" when asked if you've learned your lesson, but that doesn't make it any less dumb a response.

The foul by Drew was excessive, as was the 2 game suspension and the ridiculous fine. A 1 game suspension would have sent the message to Drew and the rest of the league.

I agree with AB on NOT making a public apology to Beasley. Why would we want Bynum to make a public invitaion into the paint. The guards of opposing teams need to fear our center and deter them from attempting layups in the future.

Welcome Back Drew! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uIPS4LyveJs

Ha! Jon K you kill me! I miss the 80s. Everyone is so winey in today’s game. All of these war analogies should be reserved for Sunday in the fall, on the frozen tundra; not for a game played in a warm gym under the protective gaze of Stern
`
I do worry about Bynum though. He's only 23 and while emotions can be a good thing, we can't have him missing any games come playoff time...

MM is rummaging through whatever is out there to discredit AB. His failed previous attempts to discrediting AB have not paid off, so he is diving to the bottom of the barrel now to dig up something. This is wrong and insane. Yes, he commited a foul for which he should have been suspended and was suspended, but to imply ad nauseam that he has not learned from it because he said that it was a hard foul is manaical. He has aplogized to Beasley who is the secong party. It's arguable that the foul was flagrant. It is equally arguable that the foul was intentional but not malicous. Your wild and weird conclusions are contrived and untenable.

find something else to write about suspension served this is sports its about winning give your sorries to your wife

@Truth sez Your wild and weird conclusions are contrived and untenable.

MM, I think you've done your job here. Folks, this is a blog fercrisakes. It's where humanity now goes to be wild and weird (since the Dead stopped touring). I'm enjoying the passion.

GO LAKERS ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Truth, I don't think this is a contrived and untenable post. As I understand it, the unstated question that MM is positing in this: does Andrew's public response to the suspension help or hurt him?

You may not feel that he needs to publicly apologize to Beasley, but a public statement that "I don't think I did anything wrong" cannot possibly be viewed as a net positive here. My point, and I think MM's point, is that even if Andrew doesn't think he did anything wrong, publicly saying as much was not a wise move. The league is likely to take note of this response, and the next time he is involved in a physical play for which he might want the benefit of the doubt, he is now (in my view) less likely to get that benefit.

As for the play itself, a forearm shiver to the midsection of an airborne player, with absolutely no attempt whatsoever to make a play on the ball, is not "arguably" a flagrant foul. It is the definition of a flagrant foul; and of the "flagrant 2" variety to boot.

Bynum didn't foul Beasley out of frustration.

He fouled him because he was out of position to make a play, and was getting tired. He got there late and used a forearm to make sure Beasley didn't get the dunk. Had Beasley gotten the dunk, it could have given the T-Wolves momentum in what what a close game at that point with neither team really playing all that well. Bynum speaks about "momentum" during the questioning session.

Another thing. If Beasley keeps attacking the rim like he did on that play against Drew, he's going to get hurt plenty more times in this league. Players who score attacking the basket and jumping 30 feet in the air are considered high-risk players to begin with. Players today are lacking fundamentals, most specifically the mid-range jumpshot. If Beasley had a mid-range pullup or a teardrop shot, he could have used that as soon as he saw Bynum coming over.

Ultimately, Beasley's job is to score for his team. Bynum's job is to protect the rim. Over the course of 82 games, snit is gonna happen. It happened to Shaq against Stuckey a few years ago. I don't recall Shaq apologizing for that. I also don't recall Fisher apologizing for what he did to Scola 2 years ago either.

"6. Brown, a throw-in when Lakers get Morrison.
...

Posted by: KobeMVP888 | March 25, 2011 at 10:45 AM "

Actually that was a salary dump trade to get out from RadMan's contract which I don't understand why they couldn't dump Morrison faster (cuz no one wanted him)....Morrison was the throw in on that trade, the Lakers wanted Brown all along, in being drafted, Brown was picked, then next pick was Lakers pick, and they took Jordan Farmar....I think they wanted Brown, Lakers always pick athletic types then figure out what to do with them....

Once again, Webster shoves ridnour into Barnes, that's followed by a tweet and a shot of Barnes kinda fired up...no technical on Webster.....he tried to instigate something...

As for the play itself, a forearm shiver to the midsection of an airborne player, with absolutely no attempt whatsoever to make a play on the ball, is not "arguably" a flagrant foul. It is the definition of a flagrant foul; and of the "flagrant 2" variety to boot.

Posted by: God | March 25, 2011 at 01:20 PM

This is not an argument. It is a recitation of the factual scenario. I would like you to define what a flagrant foul and flagrant 2 foul are and then apply the facts to the definitions. I will respond when you do that. Also, your redition of MM's article is his subsidiary point. The conclusion that is contrived and untenable (which I was referring to) is that AB has not learned his lesson. I don't know how he got to that conclusion from what AB said.

MM why did you delete my comment responding to god's defense of you? You want to criticize AB and don't want to be criticized?

God,

I'm sorry for any tension and disagreements we had yesterday, or the day before, I just wanted to make sure you're ok, I'm not admitting any guilt or anything, I'm just making sure we're cool.

H.

Could we have a comment from Kevin McHale?

Well Mark I don't know your sports playing background but guys like Bynum get beat up on all game long, so Beasley pretty much got what someone else should have gotten. Or maybe MB had done something to Bynum or another Laker player, you do know that all players talk to each other and with that you get PAYBACK.

All sporting players face the same stuff and there will always be retaliation it is the nature of the beast, so get off your high horse bend-over and smell the road apples. Hey get outside and look around sometime you just might be surprise at the world.


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